008-vp

Isolated pool in a hardwood forest.

CHAT-1

A pool in a deep depression with buttonbush shrubs in a shallower area in the center. The overstory is pitch pine as is typical of many areas of Cape Cod. Chatham, MA, May 2005.

York2

Pool with hummocks of red maple and hemlock. During the spring melt, water flows through this area from a series of pools at varying elevations. The open area is that of the flowing water. After the spring flow, each of the pools becomes isolated. York, ME, April 2007.

York-1

Pool with hummocks of red maple and hemlock. This is the same pool as in the previous image. The pool is about two feet deep and used by mole salamanders and many invertebrates. York, ME, May 2007

BARN-1

Coastal pool in sandy area. Fowler's toads were calling from the edges of the pool. Barnstable, MA, May 2005.

BSF-301

Scrub/shrub swamp pool type. Many of the shrubs are highbush blueberry with an overstory of red maple. Middleton, MA, April 2007.

TRURO-1

M-11

Depression in low area in hardwood forest. The stone fence is along a property line. When it was built, this area was likely a cleared field. Was the wall built through the pool or did the pool appear at a later time? Middleton, MA, April 2007.

M-10maybe

Ley-lg-6

LenaPark-NorthJudson_IN

B122-wet

B122-dry

CACO-Kuhn

A typical Cape Cod pool. Heavy runoff from a three plus inch coastal storm has muddied the water. Wellfleet, MA, May 2006.

BSF-301

BARN-1

Ley-lg-6

Pool in depression between two hills with dense overstory of hemlocks. It looks shallow but is actually 2-3 feet of water and leaf litter with only six inches of clear water at the surface. Amphibian eggs are laid in the upper open water. Hatched larvae disappear into the muck. This pool is very shaded and quite cool. Breeding by wood frogs and mole salamanders does not take place until late April or early May. Leyden, MA, May 2003.

CACO-Kuhn

004-vp

005-vp

010-vp

011-vp

A pool within the sand dunes of Cape Cod National Seashore. This pool is utilized by spadefoot toads, Fowler's toads, and many invertebrates species. Truro, MA, July 2005.

012-vp

Crop circles? Varying water depths due to pool depth and rates of drying sometimes produce pronounced rings of vegetation. Plymouth, MA, July 2005.

016-vp

020-vp

022-vp

023-vp-oxbow-on-DeerfieldRiver

"Vernal pools", as we use the term, are temporary water bodies which do not have fish. Some dry yearly and some persist for longer periods. These pools are all fishless and support the lives of organisms which depend upon temporary wetlands. Pools that support vernal pool organisms are varied in appearance.

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The Vernal Pool Association, Inc is a 501(c)3 corporation

PO Box 2295

Peabody, MA 01960

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